Mark 1:2

It is said in the prophet Isaiah –

‘I am sending my messenger ahead of you;

he will prepare your way.


happenings don’t just happen

because

forerunners

have done and said enough

to have caused

or not stopped

a today in need of a new happening

we could talk of

beginnings or creatings

but we never can find

their imaginative energy

and are left with happenings

wherein stuff happens

when stuff pleases

a hallelujah is easy to sing

when stuff hurts

a prophet of old

disturbs our restlessness

murmuring

You are not stuck

we’ve been here before

stuff is not fate

happening stuff reshapes our vocation

so hallelujah any way you can


Isaiah stands for a whole prophetic tradition and leads to the prophetic nature of this Jesus.

This first quotation is from the Septuagint translation of Exodus 23:20 and Malachi 3:1. Missing from this reference is an original sense of being guarded along a way toward a prepared place.

More to the point is whether a Messiah, Rabbi, Teacher is only a Messenger or something grander. Does Mark’s use of the prophets refer to Baptizer John or Jesus? These words could apply in either direction: a messenger before Jesus (i.e., John) or a messenger before the reader (i.e., Jesus).

The easiest reading is a set up for John, but it is difficult to avoid considering the artistry of Mark who will leave his whole tale on an unspoken question of how we see Jesus and what we will do about what we see.

My preference is to read this as a set up for a final echo about messengers and whether we will receive a call to be a prophet in the line of Moses, Isaiah, Malachi, John, and Jesus. Joel reminds us of the importance to remember prophetic daughters as well as sons: Miriam, Deborah, Huldah, Anna, and Phillip’s unnamed daughters.

From this beginning, we will see if we will learn, by the end, to be messengers?

Mark 1:1

The beginning of the good news about Jesus Christ, [the Son of God].


a beginning
an announcement
seems auspicious
particularly promising
good news about
a person
presented as
claimed to be
good news embodied

again communally
old promises renewed
and new practiced
beyond old paradigms
for good news
is not reducible
to any defined deity
but carries
its own authority


Yes, a beginning is in order as we are caught in serial exiles and a current occupation with no end in sight but a final solution dissolving all promises. Hope is further away than simply being unseen.

Mark employs then-common usage of language to announce a new reality to be lived before its time.

Our tendency is to sacralize language to keep it safe from a secular, judged unholy, world. So, ἀρχή (archē, “beginning”) echoes a big-bang rather than a comforting and inviting, “Once upon a time” that can walk with us. Likewise, εὐαγγέλιον (euangelion, “good message”) comes with an extra burden of our latter-day “gospel”. In its time it was used by a new ruler to claim victory over a previous regime. Such an announcement was understood to carry with it an absolution of past wrongs, a new start, and a promise of a reordered life together.

We have caught on that this sort of political promise can’t be trusted. Time and again we take cultural memes such as specifics of “general welfare” and tweak them a bit at a time until we are confused and then redefine them to mean their opposite. For instance, a Save the Forest Act can give license to harvest old-growth trees for a moment of profit. This is standard political propaganda 101. George Orwell, Jacques Ellul, George Lakoff, and others have tried to tell us about this but it seems to be a lesson always too late for the learning.

It is important to note that the last phrase, “the Son of God” does not have a trustworthy textual pedigree. A question: Does this get us into unhelpful debates about divine/human relationships, moving Jesus too quickly from Messiah or Christ here on earth to a holy being projected into everyday life and thus beyond us? What gets lost in an addendum of Heaven to an experience of Paradise in a new earth, new Jerusalem, and a new relationship with G*D? Bottom-line, keep this phrase as a footnote, but do not read it aloud.