Mark 3:12

But he repeatedly warned them not to make him known.


don’t proclaim the obvious
it only slows the line down

now more will come
drawn by titles not result

the more I say it’s irrelevant
the fewer touches get in

I’ll just say it once more
before their muteness becomes yours

Son of God spawn of G*D
is still beside the point

this is not about you
it is resistance to Empire

Bread and Circuses can be done
but general welfare is beyond fiat

I am about reclaiming Paradise
not continuing trickle-down power

so shush your mouths
until we meet again


We are called to reveal that which we know, who we understand ourselves to be.

What is not a part of our call is to reveal the current identity of who others might be.

A weakness of naming others is our lack of knowing enough. We not only cannot see the depth and breadth of their experience, we are forever running the little we do know through our own perception and developed values. Alongside this is the honoring of others by letting them define themselves. Outing another is not good form.

Perhaps more to the point is the deep-seated sense we have of names being a source of control over another. If you have named another, so it is. This is important in everyday life—defining the situation in which we find ourselves. In the 2016 Presidential election in the USofA, Donald Trump used this force of defining his opponents in the primary and final election seasons—“crooked”, “lying”, “little”, “low-energy”—and raising himself—“tremendous”, “great”, “winning”. He said it so often that the Big Lie effect took hold. With naming comes responsibility. Trump used names to attack like a bully; Jesus asks us to say what we know and not characterize others.

Jesus is seemingly not interested in naming or defining as much as he is with partnering with G*D and engaging others for the purpose of bringing them in better contact with one another.

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